Categories
Green Thumbs Up!

Dormant Northwest, how to keep your plants alive during the winter.

   There’s no place quite like America’s Northwest, equipped with unbelievable views of Mountains, an array of Wildlife, Numerous Islands, Forest Terrain and Waterways that lead straight to the open ocean; The Northwest Territory is a dream.  

3AF70000-1CE2-4AF3-BFB4-C516913157A2

  The Northwest also has an impressive plant community with a wide range of large conifers, trees, shrubs and groundcovers as understory plants. 

   However the behavior of these plants vary depending on amount of sunlight and moisture. For instance, in places where the soil is well drained and south-facing, or in open canopy sunny conditions, you will find plants more tolerant of dry conditions. Many of these plants will grow in mixed deciduous Forest condition as well.

   Depending on the location, when fall arises most plants generally begin to conserve any stored water it has left in it and become inactive or Dormant, to preserve its life cycle during the Winter. 

  Dormancy is a natural response to adverse conditions during the cold winter months; in which plants are extremely vulnerable and may need assistance to survive.

   Below are a few gardening tips that will help you care for your garden in the Northwest Winters.

Cited directly from; https://learn.eartheasy.com/articles/ten-ways-to-prepare-your-garden-for-winter/ 

1.) Clean up rotting and finished plants. Old plants can harbor disease, pests, and funguses. Removing spent plants from the soil surface or burying them in garden trenches (if they are disease-free) prevents pests from destroying your garden; also burying old plants in your garden adds organic matter to your soil, essential improving soil tilth and overall health.

2.) Remove invasive weeds that may have taken hold over the growing season; most invasive weeds remain viable in a compost heap or weed pile, so resist the urge to simply shift them to another part of your garden. Removing invasive plants completely is the only way to prevent those plants from sprouting all over again and disrupting next year’s crop.

3.) Prepare your soil for spring. Despite the fact that most people reserve this activity for the spring, fall is a great time to dig in soil amendments like manure, compost, bone meal, kelp, and rock phosphate. In most climates, adding nutrients at this time of year means the additions have time to start breaking down, enriching your soil, and becoming biologically active. It also means you won’t have to wait until your garden dries out in the spring to work the soil for the first time. Amending, turning, or digging soil now means you’ll have already done some of the work when the busy season hits. Similarly, a fall tilling (if you till your soil in the first place) helps improve drainage before extreme weather becomes a reality.

   Once you’ve added any amendments in fall, you can cover the bed with sheet plastic or other covering to prevent winter rains from washing the amendments below the active root zone; this applies especially to raised beds since they drain more readily than in-ground beds. Remove the sheeting in early spring and till lightly with a hoe in advance of spring planting.

4.) Plant cover crops. In many climates, late summer or early fall is a good time to sow cover crops like rye, vetch or clover. These crops help prevent soil erosion, break up compacted areas and increase levels of organic matter in garden beds. Cover crops also add nutrients. Planting legumes in your garden such as clover or field peas can increase the levels of available nitrogen for garden vegetables. While a general guideline is to plant cover crops approximately one month before your first killing frost, some cover crops are hardier than others. Consult your local extension agent or seed provider to identify the best fall cover crop for your region.

5.) Prune perennials. Fall is a good time to trim some perennial garden plants, though take care to ensure you choose the right ones. Although plants like fennel benefit from a fall pruning, research shows that spent raspberry canes continue to nourish the plant’s crown into the winter. Blueberries also prefer a spring pruning, which helps safeguard the plant from exposure to disease and stress. Focus fall pruning efforts on herbs like rosemary, thyme, and sage; and vegetables like asparagus and rhubarb. Blackberries also benefit from a fall clean up. Remove spent or crossing canes to help control the plant’s vigorous spread.

6.) Divide and plant bulbs, Although spring bulbs have long since flowered and died back, other flowering bulbs like lilies bloomed more recently. Three to four weeks after that glorious array, it’s time to dig up and divide any plants that appeared crowded or straggly during the growing season. For spring bulbs, this might mean some guesswork to determine location. Other plants will be more obvious. Dig 4-8 inches away from the plant’s growing stalk, carefully loosening the soil. Lift bulbs gently and separate bulblets for immediate transplanting elsewhere in the garden.

  If you previously dug up your spring bulbs for dividing, now is the time to plant them again. Daffodils, tulips and crocuses are all ready to go back into the soil for another year’s display.

7.) Harvest and regenerate your compost. Now that the heat of summer is over and nature’s microbes are settling in for their winter’s nap, you may be tempted to ignore your compost heap. This would be a missed opportunity in two ways. First, material composted over the summer is probably finished and ready to go. Using this rich material to top up garden beds, amend deficient soils, or fertilize lawns and landscaping will nourish your soil and jumpstart growth come springtime. Second, cleaning out finished compost means making way for another batch, which—in most areas—can be insulated against winter’s chill. To keep those microbes working a little bit longer, build your fall compost heap with plenty of autumn leaves, straw, or sawdust layered with kitchen scraps and other active, green matter. For more information, read our article about successful winter composting. You can also find the basics of composting in this article.

8.) Replenish mulch; Mulching in winter has many of the same benefits as summer mulching. These include reducing water loss, protecting the soil from erosion, and inhibiting weeds. But winter mulching has other benefits as well: as the soil transitions to colder weather, the freezing and thawing of the earth can adversely affect garden plants, whose roots suffer from all that churning and heaving. Adding a thick layer of mulch to the soil surface helps regulate soil temperatures and moisture and ease the transition into winter. A thick layer of mulch around root vegetables left in the garden for your fall and winter harvest can also buffer against hard frosts and prolong your crop. And as the mulch breaks down it incorporates fresh organic material into your soil.

9.) Review the cultivars in your garden and assess your growing season. Now is the time to reconsider under-performing plants and find out if a better variety exists for your location. If your plants are performing adequately, consider extending your harvest by adding varieties that ripen earlier or later in the season. When considering vegetable performance, take careful notes for next season about what worked and what didn’t. Some of the season’s successes and failures can be chalked up to weather, but others are within your control. These include soil fertility, moisture levels, and plant placement. Although you might think you’ll remember the highs and lows of summer come springtime, recording a short list of lessons learned now will provide more information in the end.

10.) Clean and sharpen tools, Although most gardeners know they should keep tools clean and well oiled throughout the year, its difficult to keep up with this task when gardening is in full swing. Fall is a great time to rejuvenate your tools’ lifespan by giving them some attention. Begin by washing tools to remove dirt and debris. If rust is present, remove with sandpaper or a wire brush. Sharpen hoes and shovels with a basic mill file. A whetstone works well for pruners. Finally, rub the surfaces of your tools with an oiled rag coated in light machine oil. This will help seal the metal from oxygen and extend your tools’ lives for another year.

   Wherever you live, there are always steps you can take to prepare for next year’s gardening season. Taken now, these steps will not only help your spring and summer run more smoothly, they can also improve your yields over the long term.

 

Links:3AF70000-1CE2-4AF3-BFB4-C516913157A2

1.)https://19january2017snapshot.epa.gov/climate-impacts/climate-impacts-northwest_.html

2.)https://www.beautifulpacificnorthwest.com/northwest-wildlife.html 

3.)https://www.fs.usda.gov/photogallery/r6/plants-animals/gallery/?cid=2866&position=SubFeature*

4.)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northwest_Territory

5.)https://learn.eartheasy.com/articles/ten-ways-to-prepare-your-garden-for-winter/ 

6.)https://tzuchi.us/offices/sanjose (map of NW picture)

 

By meshundra2019

Hi I'm currently a Culinary student with Escoffier.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.